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Last updateWed, 11 Nov 2015 11am

Saturday, 07 February 2015 16:27

Open Up the Hearts of Love through Medical & Nursing Students’ Fellowship

Written by  Chua Chong Sing, KL & Selangor / Translated by Peggy Lee

Undergraduates from 11 universities from KL and Selangor gathered for the ‘2015 Medical& Nursing Students’ Fellowship’.  [Photograph by Lim Kar Guan]

On February 7, 115 medical and nursing students from 11 universities in KL & Selangor attended the ‘2015 Medical & Nursing Students’ Fellowship’ held at KL Tzu-Chi Jing Si Hall. The participants learnt about Tzu Chi’s medical humanities, which carry the philosophy of “curing people, treating illnesses and healing minds”.


 
Reinforce the initiative to help
 
“Medical and nursing students” are a group of enthusiastic undergraduates, who are prepared to serve the nation through their healthcare services. To reinforce the initial aspiration of these undergraduates, Tzu Chi International Medical Association (TIMA) and Tzu Chi Collegiate Youth Association (Tzu Ching) jointly organized a fellowship for them.
 
Siow Lee Yuen, Coordinator of this event, mentioned that because society today is full of temptations for fame and wealth, she would like to instil kindness, happiness and duty of helping people to this group of medical and nursing students through sharing by TIMA members. 
 
Through this fellowship, she hoped that this group of undergraduates would treat patients mindfully in future, as well as, allocate some spare time to join in other Tzu Ching activities like recycling, visiting centre for the physically and/or mentally-disabled, soliciting donations, and so on.
 
Lee Jun Yeh, a medical student from UTAR, who had participated in a Tzu Ching camp before, totally concurred with Tzu Chi’s philosophy of helping the needy regardless of race and nationality. In his earnest effort to invite his classmates to participate in the fellowship, he found that some of them doubted Tzu Chi’s missions. However, he was undeterred and continued to share with them Tzu Chi’s humanistic values. He informed, “I am so delighted to have 17 classmates to come with me today.”
 
Applause and laughter to break the ice
 
Volunteer Tee Ling Fei and Tzu Ching, Liew Rou Fui, meticulously designed a game to break the ice. They said, “We are very happy to see a very encouraging attendance for today’s fellowship. When we mention the name of your faculty, please rise and acknowledge. The rest, we shall give them a very warm round of applause.”
 
After the acknowledgement, they continued, “The next one is a very simple guessing game. Just imagine you as an egg, playing ‘rock and scissors’ with the person beside you. The one who wins will transform into a chick, another victory will transform the winner into an eagle. By the third winning, you will turn into a human. The loser will keep playing until he/she becomes human. We will see who can turn into a human fastest.”
 
The cold atmosphere instantly warmed up amidst applause and laughter. The normally serious looking medical professionals blended in well with the participants, welcoming the future medical force with great laughter and warmth.
 
Role model that touched the hearts
 
The participants were then shown a video clip about the late Dr Xiao Jing Feng, who was the most senior medical professional at Kuanshan Tzu Chi Hospital, Taiwan. Dr Xiao, passed away in Taipei on September 22, 2011 due to illness. He was a very dedicated doctor, who served patients mindfully and wholeheartedly, thus he was the role model for all Tzu Chi’s medical personnel. It is hoped that Dr Xiao’s story would inspire the inner loving- kindness of the medical students present.
 
Wang Li Wei, a medical graduate from Monash University was moved to tears seeing the selfless devotion of Dr Xiao. He said, “Despite being in his 70s, Dr Xiao travelled 80 km daily between Kuanshan and Taitung to safeguard the patients’ health with his expertise. When we are needed to help others, we are living our life to the fullest, and that makes us so blessed!”
 
He further added, “As a matter of fact, we do not own our life, only the right to utilize it. Our cells continue growing every day, but they will decay eventually. It will surely come a day when we, humans, will be returned to Earth. Hence, the real meaning of life is to be able to give and help others, instead of busily chasing after materialistic enjoyment.”
 
Thoughtful sharing that inspired loving-kindness
 
Dr Ng Poh Yin, a lively and humorous Senior Obstetrics and Gynaecology Consultant from Kuala Lumpur General Hospital, told her life story to encourage the medical students. She teasingly admitted when she chose to study medicine initially, she did not envision helping others but only thought of the lucrative income of doctors, so as to secure a materially-rich life and to become renowned.
 
Only after her encounter with Tzu Chi did she realize the true meaning of life. Therefore, she is willing to swallow her pride and humbly take part in various Tzu Chi’s activities, like recycling to protect the Earth, monthly medical outreach for refugees, Stroke Patients’ Support Group, soliciting donations for disasters victims and so forth.
 
She has finally come to realize the real meaning of being a doctor, which is to serve the people, not only treating illnesses but also to take care of the patients’ minds. She has also cultivated the four spiritual practices in Tzu Chi, that is, contentment, gratitude, understanding and accommodation.
 
Dr Ng’s sincere and amusing sharing had touched the hearts of all the participants. Abigail De Laure, a nursing student from Assunta Hospital expressed, “I am now in Year 1 and I do not quite like it. After hearing Dr Ng’s sharing, I am so touched; and I also found that medical professionals are actually very joyful and holy. I should seriously reconsider my intention to change course to hotel management.”
 
 
The value of life does not depend on the length of it but the way we utilize it to become broader and deeper. Hopefully, this group of medical and nursing students would appreciate the medical humanities of “curing people, treating illnesses and healing minds”. It is hoped that they would be able to resist the temptation of fame and wealth, and be a medical professional who serves mindfully and wholeheartedly with determination.
 
 

 
A total of 115 undergraduates attended the Medical & Nursing Students’ Fellowship conducted at KL Tzu-Chi Jing Si Hall. [Photograph by Casy Lau Chun Nee]   Everyone enjoyed the ice-breaking game. [Photograph by Casy Lau Chun Nee]

A total of 115 undergraduates attended the Medical & Nursing Students’ Fellowship conducted at KL Tzu-Chi Jing Si Hall. [Photograph by Casy Lau Chun Nee]
 
Everyone enjoyed the ice-breaking game. [Photograph by Casy Lau Chun Nee]
 
Student Lee Jun Yeh (2nd from right) brought along 17 classmates to the fellowship. [Photograph by Casy Lau Chun Nee]   Dr Ng Poh Yin’s humorous sharing drew laughter from the floor. [Photograph by Casy Lau Chun Nee]

Student Lee Jun Yeh (2nd from right) brought along 17 classmates to the fellowship. [Photograph by Casy Lau Chun Nee]
 
 
Dr Ng Poh Yin’s humorous sharing drew laughter from the floor. [Photograph by Casy Lau Chun Nee]
 
Newly-graduated medical student, Wang Li Wei, was very touched by the selfless dedication of Dr Xiao Jing Feng. [Photograph by Casy Lau Chun Nee]   Facilitator, Dr Lim Lei Jun (in white) mindfully shared her experience with the group. [Photograph by Lim Kar Guan]

Newly-graduated medical student, Wang Li Wei, was very touched by the selfless dedication of Dr Xiao Jing Feng. [Photograph by Casy Lau Chun Nee]
 
 
Facilitator, Dr Lim Lei Jun (in white) mindfully shared her experience with the group. [Photograph by Lim Kar Guan]
 
Nursing student, Abigail De Laure would reconsider her intention of changing faculty after being touched by Dr Ng’s sharing. [Photograph by Casy Lau Chun Nee]    

Nursing student, Abigail De Laure would reconsider her intention of changing faculty after being touched by Dr Ng’s sharing. [Photograph by Casy Lau Chun Nee]