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Saturday, 20 February 2016 00:00

Go with the Flow of Nature and Live a Life of High Quality

Written by  Lee Heng Lun, Seremban / Translated by Lee Yuk Suat

About 50 public members and volunteers attended the seminar on health by Dr Reece Lim Chih Chian. [Photograph by Wong Siew Chin]

Humans are part of nature, but as time evolves with the advancement of transportation and communication, our understanding of the nature is becoming vague. Backed by scientific evidence, Dr Reece Lim Chih Chian shared in a recent talk on ways to adapt to the modern life, and live harmoniously with the nature.


Humans are part of nature, but as time evolves with the advancement of transportation and communication, our understanding of the nature is becoming vague. Backed by scientific evidence, Dr Reece Lim Chih Chian shared in a recent talk on ways to adapt to the modern life, and live harmoniously with the nature.

On February 20, 2016, Seremban Jing-Si Books & Café had invited Honorary Professor Dr Reece Lim Chih Chian from Australia Nutritional and Wellness Association to give a talk to 51 members and volunteers on the topic, “How to live a high quality life”. Dr Lim shared about nutritional remedy, a natural therapy attained through living in harmony with nature; and how to live gracefully till old age.

When she carried out palliative care for the father of a student in the “Children’s Achievement Class”, she saw how the father was told by the doctor to wait, and this made her ponder the future of scientific research and medicine. She thought, “Scientific research is meant to develop medicine, thus enabling doctors to save life. But why are we unable to help him when we can do more?”

A tumour requires years to develop into ten centimetres, so what can we do to prevent its formation? With all sorts of doubts, coupled with the influence of her father’s concept of life, she decided to break out of laboratory to become a propagator of health education. To her, an ill person is likened to a person who is drowning, a doctor would be the lifeguard, and she would play the role of stopping the person from jumping into the river.

There was no technical jargon used during the talk, only logic and real-life examples. It was a spirited and lively presentation done in a moderate speed, and at times, the audience broke into laughter when some interesting points were raised.

Recognize the relations with nature

As transportation and information technology develop further, humans ironically become more ignorant about the natural environment. A disheartened Dr Lim shared, “We probably are aware that food like vegetables may have come from the supermarket, but forgot that it is produced by the nature. If we are unable to recognize this, we are unable to connect and coexist with the nature.”

To coexist peacefully with the nature, living beings need to make necessary adjustments according to the environment to continue surviving. She expressed that only the fittest would survive and procreate; the weaker ones will die out. Hence we must stay strong and healthy, and our body cells play a pivotal role.

Whether one is in good health or experiences pathological change, it is all related to the cells. The human body is formed by many cells, and each cell has its respective functions. For example, an immune cell can search for and eliminate cancer cell. However, data have shown that one died of various types of cancer every four seconds.

Dr Lim was puzzled: “Since our bodies are capable of eliminating cancer cells, how could we allow the cancer cells grow so big, even spread to the whole body? Where exactly is the problem?”

Lifestyle is the root cause

“Many people do not die of a disease but ignorance,” Dr Lim said in earnest. The ignorance about health has caused people to neglect signs of suboptimal health status (SHS), such as nose sensitivity, regular cold, headache, constipation; they think of these as small problems but in actual fact, these are signals from the body calling for help. However, majority of the people have chosen to ignore the mild symptoms. Gradually, it evolves into a degenerative disease.  At present, 75% of the people suffer from SHS, and 20% are at clinical stage.

Dr Lim subsequently explained about the three factors affecting health – gene, lifestyle and environment. She disagreed that all hereditary diseases were genetic. Instead she felt that the inherited lifestyle could be the cause, “If your family members have been taking oily food for generations, it is unsurprising that they became obese.” Lifestyle and environment therefore are one’s choice.

Eat for better health

A balanced diet is crucial as it feeds the cells with the needed macronutrients (carbohydrate, protein, fat, water and fibre) and micronutrients (vitamins, minerals and anti-oxidant).

Yet, modern dietary habits have led to compulsive overeating and intake of low quality macronutrients such as refined carbohydrate and trans fat. As a result, the body is forced to find certain ways to maintain an internal balance, and even demands more energy to operate. For example, if we are eating food with high sugar content, the body will become acidic and consequently, it will have to extract calcium from the bone to balance the pH value.

The modern-day food also lacks micronutrients, including calcium. For instance, when the intake of nutrition is not enough to supplement the need and the body is making up for it frequently, a premature osteoporosis is bound to happen.

A balanced nutrient intake depends on the environment and lifestyle. Dr Lim remarked, “In the past, we only needed to eat an apple, but now we are eating 20 apples to meet the needs.” Due to numerous factors such as undue pressure, environmental pollution and processed food, the intake has increased relatively. However, people have not adjusted accordingly and when the intake is insufficient, the body will start consuming the nutrients reserved earlier. Over time, the body will suffer from SHS.

To put it simply, the way we eat affects our health. Dr Lim proposed to reduce oil, salt and sugar for three months, and see for ourselves the improvements on our body. Better still, start from young or even from pregnancy, she reiterated. She was grateful that her parents had inculcated a healthy lifestyle in her since her childhood and this had set the foundation for good health.

A young participant, Sim Ru Hao, agreed with Dr Lim. He shared about his obesity problem during high school days, and how he successfully controlled his weight through diet and exercise. He felt that the Malaysian eating habits could easily cause one to put on weight.

He took down the key points diligently to explore further and to adjust his nutrient intake. He concurred that wellness had to begin from young to achieve quality of life. He promised to share the information with others.

Live a life of high quality

Apart from the diet, a reasonable amount of exercise, effective management of emotions and a detox regimen are indispensable elements to live a life of high quality.

Chan Yoke Mui, who is often busy with school work and Tzu Chi voluntary work, felt that the speaker had encouraged the adoption of a traditional lifestyle. To her, as long as we eat more fruits and vegetables, and do not stay up late, we will be healthy. After listening to the talk, she decided not to give excuses anymore but to take full responsibility of her own health. She felt that attitude was important because if there was no will to change, we would not be able to gain a good health no matter how much knowledge we possessed.

Yap Kwee Ying, who is a teacher, felt that the talk had approached the subject matter from a scientific point of view, and that the talk was different from other talks. Although she had gained health tips from various channels, she might forget the pointers sometimes. The talk was a reminder for her. “During the New Year, I had enjoyed myself most of the time and did not exercise. It is time to exercise again,” she said with a smile.



Even though the talk has enabled the audience to have a basic understanding of health, the success or failure depends very much on the attitude (80%) and less on the knowledge (20%). To stay fit and strong, one must have the correct view on the nature and health, and take one’s health seriously. Otherwise, a high quality life will remain a distant dream. Without a good health, the pursuit of wealth, career and relationships will become meaningless.

 

Volunteer Chan Yoke Mui (2nd right) hopes to exercise more for a healthy body. [Photograph by Wong Siew Chin]   Dr Reece Lim Chih Chian was surprised by a belated birthday celebration. [Photograph by Wong Siew Chin]

Volunteer Chan Yoke Mui (2nd right) hopes to exercise more for a healthy body. [Photograph by Wong Siew Chin]
 
Dr Reece Lim Chih Chian was surprised by a belated birthday celebration. [Photograph by Wong Siew Chin]